Global Climate Week Walkout

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On the morning of September 27, 169 students from PCS gathered in order to walk out for the global climate strike. At lunch, students walked out of school along with other protesters worldwide in order to amplify the world’s awareness about the impacts of global climate change. Students marched down Mission Street, making their way to Santa Cruz High School to meet with students from other schools. They proceeded to march downtown, stopping in front of Wells Fargo Bank, where they met with more students and other independent advocates, some of whom gave speeches. The march did not stop there. Protesters continued down Pacific Avenue, with drums banging and crowds chanting.

“The generation that’s actually going to take charge isn’t the adults, but the kids of today,” said one PCS 7th grader who attended the march.

This student raises the question of whether adults are listening to youth climate change activism. During the march, when students were asked whether or not adults were doing enough to fight against climate change, they shouted a strong “No!” According to the Santa Cruz Sentinel, students from Mission Hill Middle, Santa Cruz High, Harbor High, Soquel High, Branciforte Middle, Monarch Community Elementary, Pacific Collegiate, Georgiana Bruce Kirby, Cabrillo College and UC Santa Cruz participated in the walkout. In total, as stated by the Santa Cruz Sentinel, hundreds of people marched that day.

PCS freshman, Rosalyn Bourdow, regarded her experience as inspiring, saying, “It gave me some hope and influenced me to get more involved in climate activism.” The popular opinion among students appeared to be that the experience was eye-opening. 

To see such a diverse group of people rising above their differences for a greater cause is the progress the Earth needs for its survival. No matter where you stand on the issue of climate change, this march can show an amazing display of how people can make their voices heard.

 

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